Hellebore

Today there is a huge range of Hellebore (x hybridus types) available in a range of colours from black to pink to yellow; you’ll even find spotted types within the Gardens. Unlike many plants Hellebores are mainly grown as strains from seed not named cultivars. This means that each one is an individual and will have its own colour or markings. Once planted Hellebore flower from December through to May in some cases and provide lush green foliage that makes good ground cover for the rest of the year. At Aberglasney they are one of our favourite plants and we…

Daffodil/Narcissus

Aberglasney has developed a comprehensive collection of Daffodils with representations of all of the different sub-sections of plants in the Narcissus genus. These are seen around the Gardens in galleries and walks. The collection currently contains nearly four hundred different types including rare varieties such as Narcissus ‘Segovia’ and will continue to grow over the coming years. The Narcissus or daffodil is the National flower for Wales hence we feel we should have such a large collection. They also have a flowering period which starts in November with Narcissus ‘Cedric Morris’ and finishes in June. In season a map is…

Magnolia

Aberglasney boasts many rare and unusual types of Magnolia. Amongst our visitors’ favourites is Magnolia ‘Felix Jury’. Bred in New Zealand by leading Magnolia breeders, Felix and Mark Jury, ‘Felix’ is a stunning new form which, once it reaches 5 – 6 years in age, will produce huge (up to 30cm across) bright pink flowers in early spring. Each flower is impressive in itself but as they appear in good numbers then the overall effect is really spectacular. It will perform best in a sunny spot with protection from strong winds.Magnolia macrophylla is rare even in its native habitat of…

Tulips

One of the highlights of spring at Aberglasney is the Tulips. Probably their biggest strength is that they come in a range of colours that are easy to mix. It is not often you see two or three Tulips that don’t match. They also work well with other spring bedding plants which means you can create good displays by mixing Tulip colours that suit the other plants that are in flower.In traditional bedding displays we mix Tulips with wall flowers that are usually cream in colour on the parterre. In other parts of the Gardens we mix Tulips with blue…

Camassia

Bolt upright flower spikes of star-shaped, blue or creamy flowers push through the grassy leaves of this elegant bulbous perennial in late spring. It’s vigorous enough to use in a wildflower meadow but does need damp soil. Bulbs can be planted in autumn, arranging in drifts for a natural effect. The leaves die back soon after flowering. Camassia leichtlinii and Camassia leichtlinii Semiplena are two beautiful new additions to our woodland areas.No matter what the weather they seem to give a good display from late May into early June with certain varieties flowering later in June. What is especially good…

Bluebells

For all the rare and unusual pants that we grow at Aberglasney there is still something special about our bluebell woodlands. Bluebells are a British native that are dear to most people. With good management they make an excellent native plant display in most woodland but in Beech woodland they are especially good.At Aberglasney we try to keep as many as possible and integrate them with our woodland plant schemes. This does often mean that we have to lift and transplant large numbers when they spread too far. You will either be a gardener who has to weed them out…

Spring Bedding

When bedding is mentioned most people automatically think of summer bedding and not spring bedding. However some of the very best bedding displays are in the spring not summer.More often than not what is sold as winter bedding only really comes into its own in the spring. This has been the case at Aberglasney where the combination of alabaster wallflowers and Tulips look fantastic in spring.The real star of the bedding is the Tulip as they form the bulk of the display in the parterre, terrace and Kitchen Garden. What is great about Tulips is the range of height, colour…

Yew Tunnel

The Yew Tunnel is thought to have been planted by the Dyer Family in the eighteenth century. This glorious fusion of thick tree trunks will live for centuries if looked after properly. Taxus baccata can be old or merely look old – and often defy dating. Experts had been fooled into thinking the half dozen or so that make up Aberglasney’s Yew Tunnel were over 1,000 years old. In 1999 dendrochronology put the trees at just a quarter of that age.The Victorians in particular were fascinated by these strange trees and their magnificent shaping and many visitors to the house…

Kitchen Garden

At Aberglasney we have to pack all our productive plants into the Kitchen Garden, which seems quite big, that is until you start to list all the things you want to grow. We have therefore spent a lot of time working out how to make the most of the space. There are a number of different ways of doing this and despite having technical names most are very simple tasks that just require some planning.The first is crop rotation which simply means not growing the same plant in the same place; this allows you to change your layout throughout the…

Malus Arbor

Aberglasney’s Malus sargentii Arbour is one of the Gardens most striking features when in full flower. This stunning Crab Apple from Mororan in Japan is situated in Aberglasney’s Lower Walled Garden and is a wonderful sight when it is alive with bees and hums like some kind of natural electric motor. The single white flowers are followed by small cherry-like fruits, which last well into the autumn.As a feature it is one of the most asked about in the Gardens and people are always fascinated about how you achieve something like this.In fact building features with fruit is quite easy…